Why I decided to write a spin-off of The Birth and why more books will submerge in 2020.

When I wrote the first few chapters of my dark fantasy series, The Birth was not in the plan. Well, once again neither was Lola: Aftermath of The Birth.


Here are the following reasons why I have to write outside of my volume series, and why I triple check everything before announcing an upcoming book


The worlds in The Black Wing series are vast.

In The Birth, you learn there is another world out there, Osois, an icy planet with an entire history that has yet to be explored.

Osois and its two moons.

In The Conflict, you uncover something beyond Earth, a secret that has been held for billions of years.

I’m not writing this to complain or validate my reasons, but rather, these scenes don’t belong in the main series. So I must write them in a separate book.

Here is what would have happened if I did NOT follow my gut:

  • LONG FLASH BACKS
  • LONG EXPLANATIONS
  • UNNECESSARY EXPLANATION

Long Flash Backs

I like them, but not if it’s going to confuse or draw out the attention of the story. I don’t want to write unnecessary scenes and conversation unless my fantasy readers are already in the loop. Granted, there will be flashbacks in several chapters, but not all can fit in one book. Not on mine at the least.

Long Explanation

It leads to more questions!

If you have read The Birth, you learn about Lenurs (A video series of my species will be coming soon ) and their way of life. Lola learned of Lenurs and Osois through Avalon, and since The Birth was written in first person, it was thrown at (you) readers. For example:

Why is the Emperor immortal? Why is Eihbohn a meatless voice who Avalon trusted to watch over Lola and yet *Spoiler*? Why are Elites known to be the best and what’s the issue with their caspedian cloth?

Unnecessary Explanations

One of the things I’m trying to avoid when I’m talking about events in the past that shape the series is flooding the book when the attention is supposed to go elsewhere.

You’re always going to move forward–into the future in volumes of The Black Wing Series. Lets stay there if we can.

Do I have answers all of these questions? Yes, and I have much to give!

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Is Your Chapter Worth It?

Do you ever read through your chapters, and ask yourself, am I adding fillers or is this moving the plot? If you’re not asking yourself that, now is the time to go back to Chapter 1!

Here is an example of what you may say to justify why you wrote what you wrote.

  • This may bore my reader but they need to know this back story so I can deliver the punch they will get at the end!
  • I have to increase my word count.
  • Too much is happening right now, my characters need a break!
  • My book is unique it is not meant to follow the norm.

Here is what I say about my book, The Birth

It is still too early for my readers know who Avalon is, what the heck an Ososi is, and how Lenurs live in Talen! Introducing Avalon early and not building on Lola’s character will draw my readers to her as she is the one who turns Lola’s life upside down! We are looking at the world through Lola’s eyes, but who is she anyway and how did she end up in a cabin on the Okanogan National Forest?

You’re writing it, but they’re reading it

Your readers can’t turn the next page unless you give them a reason to, many writers say you need to add conflict, or put some kind of struggle your character is facing in order to keep your readers hooked–well they’re right, but it’s risky to throw the first thing that comes to your mind without taking three steps back and then ten steps forward to see if it’s keeping in track of your chapter! I’m a pantser, I can write a book from Chapter 1 to end but I will also fall back on outlining when I’m taking three steps backs and then ten steps forward.

Three steps back , ten steps forward

If you’re writing a stand alone novel with no plans to make a sequel or series, you don’t need to steep too much to implement the mysterious scenes you haven’t told your readers yet. If you’re writing epics, sagas, series, chronicles–whatever you may call them, you also don’t want your chapters to be a filler! We are not making a jelly filled doughnut!

What to consider if your chapter is worth it

  • Can I bring this scene later in the chapters, or books ahead, and why is it significant?
  • Unless that red hat your character keeps describing is going to blow up or turn into a rabbit or have some other significance, you don’t need to keep grinding it on every chapter!
  • You’re describing the setting very well, but how long will your character stay there? If he or she is just passing by, make it brief or skip it (unless you’re adding symbolic messages) use description in areas they will be spending most of their time but implement it well!
  • I love dialogues but if my character keeps saying “Why?” put your picture on the wall of shame and erase it (I do this all the time).

Final Thoughts

But if you felt my advice was wrapping you up in twine, and somewhat giving you an uncomfortable squeeze, I know I have done a job well done. Remember, your story is still your story, but do you want to know who else calls it theirs? Your readers.